In This State: Son of a slave became an orchardist, a legislator and more

William John Anderson started his orchard in 1911 on his father's farm behind Shoreham's St. Genevieve's Catholic Church. By the late 1920s Anderson's Diamond A Orchard had expanded along Route 22A and was one of the most highly regarded in the state. At one time Anderson was cultivating 3,500 trees. In 1935 he was elected president of the Vermont Horticultural Society. He had his own packaging plant, and in 1943 he harvested 40,000 bushels of apples from his orchard. Photograph courtesy of Shoreham Historical Society

Earlier this fall, the Shoreham Historical Society received a copy of a letter William John Anderson wrote in 1944 to a former teacher, a note of thanks that enriches our understanding of the African-American experience in one of the whitest states in the country.

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SCOV Law Blog: A subdivision dispute wends its way through the courts

Creative Commons photo by walknboston via Flickr

A landowner wishes to add an apartment to a single-family home in Burlington, as well as subdivide the property into two lots. Predictably, lots of folks get upset about it.

YWP: Gone Spacewalking

Zoe Riell is a senior who is homeschooled in Poultney. Courtesy photo

This week’s entry from the Young Writers Project is “Gone Spacewalking” by Zoe Riell, a home-schooled senior from Poultney.

YWP: Misunderstood

Fiona Sweeney is an eighth- grade student at Crossroads Academy. Courtesy photo

This week’s Young Writers Project entry is “Misunderstood” by Fiona Sweeney, an eighth-grade student at Crossroads Academy.

SCOV Law Blog: Torts, threats and thuggery

Creative Commons photo by walknboston via Flickr

This case helps define how much responsibility a police officer has to protect a specific person when a complaint is made about a potential attacker.

In This State: Quimby Country reflects a century of changes in fishing in the North Country

Vermont Gov. George Aiken, right, fishes with his friend Kansas Gov. Alf Landon, left, in this photo, circa the 1930s. Photo courtesy of Quimby Country archive

Quimby Country, the oldest operating sportsman’s camp in Vermont, is getting ready to close the doors on its 118th season.

YWP: Ophidiophobia

Ella Woodruff is an eighth-grader at Charlotte Central School. Courtesy photo

This week’s Young Writers Project entry is “Ophidiophobia” by Ella Woodruff, an eighth-grader from Charlotte.

SCOV Law Blog: Complying with Rule 11

Creative Commons photo by walknboston via Flickr

A trial court found merit in the State’s violation of probation complaint and revoked petitioner’s probation, sentencing him to the underlying sentence denoted in the plea agreement.

Book Review: ‘My Thinning Years: Starving the Gay Within’

my thinning years corteau

There are many poignant parallels for me in Jon Derek Croteau’s beautifully crafted memoir of surviving an abusive father and overcoming his own anorexia and internalized homophobia.

SCOV Law Blog: Tripping over the rules of evidence

Creative Commons photo by walknboston via Flickr

The facts underlying this case involve a harrowing attempted kidnapping in which the victim was attacked by an unknown assailant, who physically assaulted her and tried unsuccessfully to force her into his pickup truck before fleeing the scene.

YWP: Turquoise

Mianda Wood is a high school junior from Craftsbury. Courtesy photo

This week’s Young Writers Project entry is “Turquoise” by Mianda Wood, a high school junior from Craftsbury.

In This State: Artist Charlie Hunter’s ‘murky paintings of decaying American infrastructure’

Charlie Hunter finds poignant subject matter in the neighborhood around his studio, which is located in Bellows Falls' former industrial center. His T-shirt, which he designed, reads: “Bellows Falls, Vermont: Not Nearly As Bad As You Thought." Photo by Mark Bushnell

Drawing a darker vision of the world hasn’t hurt Charlie Hunter’s career. He has been receiving national recognition as a painter with a unique viewpoint.

YWP: Dog’s Perspective

Finnian Abbey is a seventh-grader at Browns River Middle School in Jericho. Courtesy photo

This week’s entry in the Young Writers Project is “Dog’s Perspective,” by Finnian Abbey, a seventh-grader at Browns River Middle School in Jericho.

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