The behind-the-scenes battle for superdelegates

Sanders

Bernie Sanders speaks to thousands in Ypsilanti, Mich., on Monday. Photo courtesy of the Sanders campaign.

While the fight for the presidency plays out in public with primaries and caucuses, a different battle is being waged behind the scenes — the effort to win over superdelegates to the national convention, many of whom have already declared the candidate they will back.

In the public fight, Hillary Clinton, the narrow winner in Iowa, and Sen. Bernie Sanders, who finished first in New Hampshire, appear to be neck and neck. But in the backstage battle, the margin is lopsided, raising questions about the process.

The nominating convention isn’t until July, but Sanders allies have amped up criticism on the superdelegate count in the Granite State, where Clinton came out badly bruised, losing the popular vote by more than 20 points. Even so, she managed to secure a few more delegates than Sanders.

That revelation prompted MoveOn.org and the New Hampshire Republican Party, which sees Sanders as a weaker general election candidate, to circulate petitions demanding superdelegates follow the will of voters.

While hundreds of superdelegates have already committed to Clinton — including a number of Vermont political stalwarts many of whom are uncommitted — say it’s too early in the primary process to officially endorse.

Sanders recently met with a number of superdelegates. He said over the weekend on CBS’ “Face the Nation” that he was confident he could eventually garner the support of party leaders across the nation.

“I think if we continue to do well around the country and if superdelegates — whose main interest in life is to make sure that we do not have a Republican in the White House — if they understand that I am the candidate and I believe that I am who is best suited to defeat the Republican nominee, I think they will start coming over to us,” Sanders said.

While Sanders holds a slight edge over Clinton in regular delegates, 36-32, his lead dwindles when superdelegates are taken into account.

Clinton has picked up 87 more superdelegates since New Hampshire, bringing her overall delegate lead to 481 to Sanders’ 55, according to an Associated Press tally released Thursday.

There are 712 superdelegates nationally. Nearly 200 remain uncommitted, according to the Associated Press. The superdelegates represent about 30 percent of the 2,382 delegates needed to claim the Democratic Party nomination.

Delegates are allowed to flip at any time before the summer convention in Philadelphia, where the presidential nominee will be chosen.

Sanders has picked up a handful of superdelegates since New Hampshire. He is banking on a wave of primary wins to promote his electability and pressure Clinton loyalists to flip sides.

Sanders’ quest for Vermont superdelegates

While Sanders is projected to capture a decisive win in Vermont – and net most of the 16 delegates — Clinton could easily capture a majority of the state’s 10 superdelegates.

In an interview with VTDigger on Thursday, one of those super delegates — Rep. Peter Welch, D-Vt. — wouldn’t say who he would endorse for the presidential race.

“It is ideal for the party when there’s an alignment between what the overall popular vote is and the so-called ‘superdelegates,’” Welch said Thursday. “If there’s a big divide at the convention, that’s really bad for the party.”

(However, on Friday, less than 24 hours later, Welch apparently dropped that view and declared his support for Sanders on Vermont Public Radio. His chief of staff said he made the decision Friday morning.)

Clinton has already secured four other Vermont superdelegates: U.S. Sen. Patrick Leahy, Gov. Peter Shumlin, Former Gov. Howard Dean and Billi Gosh. Other superdelegates include Richard Cassidy, a lawyer who served in the Dean administration, and Sanders himself, who as a member of the state’s Congressional delegation is granted a vote.

The uncommitted superdelegates include Rep. Timothy Jerman, D-Jericho, Dottie Deans, chair of the Vermont Democratic Party and Jim Condos, the Vermont Secretary of State.

“I go back and forth on my decision all the time,” Deans said. “I’m really trying to listen to not only Vermonters, but also the nation.”

Jerman said he wants to take into account Sanders’ “native son state” status, but he did not fault the Vermont delegates who have backed Clinton.

“A lot of the people from our state who have made a decision have very personal contacts with both of the candidates,” Jerman said. “They’ve known them for years.”

Nationally, Sanders’ superdelegates include U.S. Reps. Keith Ellison and Raul Grijalva, who often stump on the trail for Sanders.

Former Sen. Paul Kirk of Massachusetts, a longtime confidant of Ted Kennedy, has also thrown his support behind Sanders, as well as a few other party leaders nationally.

Paul Kirk

Paul Kirk, former U.S. senator from Massachusetts, endorses Sanders at a press conference Thursday. Photo by Jasper Craven/VTDigger

While the Sanders superdelegates often praise his policies, they also say Sanders has the potential to bring in new voters to the Democratic party – a common reason for a superdelegate endorsement.

For Grijalva, an Arizona progressive, Sanders can better attract Latino voters. Ellison says Sanders’ economic message has powerful potential in African American communities.

“I determined that Senator Sanders offers the greatest opportunity for down ballot victories in 2016,” said Jake Quinn, a North Carolina delegate and activist who is backing Sanders. “If Sanders tops my ticket, he will attract unaffiliated voters and Republican voters.”

Chad Nodland, a North Dakota delegate and lawyer who backed Sanders last summer, said that even if his state swings towards Clinton, he believes that Sanders is the right candidate for his constituents.

“If I had the chance to sit down with each and every one I think I could convince them that Bernie is the right choice,” Nodland said.

While the superdelegate issue has all the signs of a full-blown scandal to Sanderistas, their mistrust of the Democratic National Committee is nothing new.

The Sanders campaign has criticized members of the Democratic National Committee – especially chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz –as establishment party actors working to help Clinton.

They have charged the DNC with organizing a low-visibility debate schedule and unfairly cutting the campaign off from crucial voter data after a breach by a Sanders staffer.

Schultz confronted the dissonance between delegates and voters on CNN last week, saying “Unpledged delegates exist really to make sure that party leaders and elected officials don’t have to be in a position where they are running against grass-roots activists.”

Jasper Craven

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  • Fred Woogmaster

    As a result of having limited mobility, I have been watching a lot of TV to accompany my normal computer activity. I have watched the debates, I have watched the Pope, I have watched Trump – trump and be trumped – I have watched the ads I have watched the endorsements. Although I am an (I) my opinion about the “superdelegate system”, like many others, is that it is undemocratic. Fitting for the Democratic Party? I think not.

    Yesterday I watched two major TV endorsement interviews; one with Rep. James Clyburn, the highest ranking African American member of Congress, and superdelegate, who endorsed Clinton and the other with Morgan Freeman, highly esteemed African American actor and celebrity, who also endorsed Clinton. I watched as Peter Welch endorsed Sanders, giving me greater hope that the “supers” will come around to Sanders.

    Morgan Freeman was being interviewed on CNN, ostensibly about a new Hillary ad that he had narrated – splendidly of course. He endorsed Hillary and did not mention Bernie. The “establishment” presents itself every day in the guise of the DNC and Rep. Wasserman and the superdelegates and even Rep. John Lewis. What has become abundantly clear to me – when those closest to “the establishment” get to know Bernie as well as they know Hillary (and Bill) – they like him more. Bernie Sanders is beginning to demonstrate “elderwisdom” which has surely been absent for the majority of our contemporary political rhetoric.

    It IS quite amazing. The game IS rigged; the table IS tilted – and – Bernie Sanders CAN be elected President – superdelegates and all.

  • bruce wilkie

    When “superdelegates” are allowed to circumvent the will of the people, democracy is dead.

    • Nancy Baer

      That is correct Bruce..and it has been going on for a long time! I believe as we educate ourselves more we will “SEE” what is REALLY going on with our “farce” of a political system. It certainly is NOT what our forefathers intended!!!! It is OF THE RICH~BY THE RICH~AND FOR THE RICH!!!!

  • sandra bettis

    I am very upset with Leahy – what is he thinking – if he ignores what Vermonters vote for, how can he call himself our representative?

    • Nancy Baer

      I absolutely agree with you Sandra. We need to remember LEAHY’S CHOICE, and it is NOT #Bernie! He is part of the “establishment”..that is WHY. You see..they can be Democrats too. But then there are Democrats that I am proud to have as my “voice”..Welch. He is standing WITH THE PEOPLE AND #BERNIE. Vote Democrat for ANY AND EVERY OPEN SEAT THAT YOU SEE..so we can Get #Bernie..once he gets to Washington..a congress/house/senate that WILL WORK WITH HIM..instead of filibustering over and over like they have with our current President. President Obama is a GOOD President who has been treated with SUCH DISRESPECT! Washington is FULL of CORRUPTION..and THE ONLY WAY to CHANGE THIS is to VOTE OUT the REPUBLICANS and vote in the Democrats(so many which are no less corrupt than Republicans(got to pick the LESSER OF TWO EVILS). GET OUT YOUR VOTE FOR #Bernie Sanders everyone!! LET US TAKE BACK THE PEOPLE’S HOUSE! LET US REMEMBER WHO WORKS FOR US!!!!!!! Note; Shumlin is a “so-called” Democrat also..but he is part of the “establishment”. Thank God he is leaving office!!!

  • Martha Molpus

    MoveOn.Org has a petition directed to the superdelegrates asking them to respect the votes of the people.

  • Peter Harvey

    Day by day the pill of truth is getting more bitter as I learn more about how the political establishment works; making our Bernie Political Revolution more and more relevant every day. As a Sanders supporter, reading that the superdelegates have the power to override the vote of the people, I am learning more every day about how our democracy is really just a facade, an illusion to placate us. Apparently the voting of the common electorate doesn’t matter to the Democratic Party establishment which puts its own personal agenda above the voting public. This so called democratic process is more rigged than I had imagined. Between big money and superdelegates, they have it wrapped up and our votes are just for show, feel good window dressing.

    I will no longer just lay down passively, voting for the lesser of two evils, as I have done too often in the past. I would rather go down fighting for the Revolution than give in to the establishment of The “Democratic” Party. Seeing the true face of reality, I will never trust or give money to the Democratic Party again. But instead, I will ensure how my contributions are spent by giving my money directly to the candidates I feel represent honesty and integrity, regardless of the party attached to their names. The Democratic Party is showing that it really isn’t any different from the Republican Party.

    I will write Bernie’s name in on the ballot if I have to!

  • Michael Badamo

    I mailed this letter to Senator Leahy yesterday:

    Dear Senator Leahy,
    I have been pleased over these many years to vote for you often. Your work in the Senate for Vermont and the nation is much appreciated.
    Therefore I was greatly surprised and disappointed to learn of your intention to completely disregard the will of the majority of Vermont Democratic voters in the exercise of your super delegate status at the upcoming Democratic convention. To me this sounds like a threat to the rank and file of Democratic voters who might express widespread disillusionment with “business as usual” in Washington. I think it is also a threat to damage or even destroy the Vermont Democratic Party if an undemocratic minority selects the candidate. Please reconsider.
    Soon we will vote and for very good reasons Vermonters will probably overwhelmingly support Senator Bernie Sanders for President. For you to preemptively cast your privileged convention ballot at this time suggests contempt for voters. You have offered as your reason a committment made to Mrs. Clinton before Senator Sanders announced his candidacy. What I hear you saying, then, is that your committment to her is more important than your committment to Vermonters and the Vermont Democratic Party. Please reconsider.
    Sincerely,
    Michael J. Badamo Montpelier, Vermont

  • We need to get rid of superdelegates. Besides being undemocratic it makes a farce of the primaries (According to his office, Pat Leahy promised Hillary his vote 2 years ago!)

    • Nancy Baer

      We DESPERATELY NEED to make HUGE REFORMS in THE PEOPLE’S HOUSE Jerry..the political system as we know it today is corrupt! We do need to get rid of superdelegates! WE THE PEOPLE NEED TO CHANGE WASHINGTON’S POLITICAL “MAKEUP”. Vote DEMOCRAT(they are the LESS OF TWO EVILS)for EVERY SINGLE SEAT THAT IS OPEN..and let us NOT FORGET in our state of VERMONT TOO!! I am hoping that SHEP gets himself in the Governor ring~because I will PROUDLY VOTE VOR HIM! Vermont does NOT NEED A REPUBLICAN GOVERNOR!!!!! As far as Leahy promising his vote to HRC~he has to live with his choice..and WE THE PEOPLE need to make OUR choices for HONEST, ETHICAL, and NON-ESTABLISHMENT CANDIDATES!!!

  • robert bristow-johnson

    i am disappointed and embarrassed that the “Democratic party” has these non-democratically chosen delegates and the “Less-Democratic” party” does not. sounds like something we need to reform.

    we should have delegates allocated roughly proportionally to population with something in the allocation formula to prevent small states from being totally swallowed up by the big states, and then **rules** for how the entire party membership of the state chooses their delegates (caucus vs. primary vs. whatever), force the elected delegates to vote according to their pledge on the first convention vote, and release them to vote their conscience or their preference on all subsequent ballots and let the wheeling-and-dealing begin at the convention.

    we should have no House of Lords in the Democratic Party in the U.S.

  • Donald Valentine

    Perhaps it should be suggested that the Vermont Democrat politicos who have already committed to Hillary ought to be committed but not politically. What a bunch of damned traitors!

    • Nancy Baer

      I couldn’t agree more Donald! These people are in it for WHAT IS BEST FOR THEMSELVES..NOT FOR WE THE PEOPLE!!! Damned, corrupt, loophole finding, rich, bloated, living off of THE PEOPLE’S TAXES, so called “politicians!” WAKE UP PEOPLE!!!

      • Tom Sullivan

        Hey Nancy,

        Just because Bernie is the home town guy, doesn’t make him the heir apparent to the super delegates, nor the best man for the job. If you want more money, then make more.

  • Karl Riemer

    This is not a defense of the DNC superdelegate allocations, which I personally think are retarded. The system was carefully considered, though, and is neither a subterfuge nor an abrogation of anyone’s rights. To the righteously indignant pontificators here, sure of their moral high ground as defenders of democracy, three points:

    1) the nomination process belongs to the party, embodied by the DNC. They have no obligation to you. They serve the interests of their party, to the best of their ability. That’s their duty. They decided, for prudent reasons, to weight the selection process heavily toward party loyalists who share their allegiance, partly by allocating delegate votes to states and districts based not on population but on the number of Democratic votes in recent elections, partly by reserving some delegate votes to themselves.

    2) we’re being treated to the spectacle of a Republican candidate running roughshod over that party, increasingly likely to capture the nomination and represent the party in its biggest race despite caring not a fig for that party’s history or principles, or really anything except himself. An offensive sociopathic narcissist is capitalizing on fragmented loyalties and mutual antipathies to kidnap a major party apparatus, against the wishes of virtually everyone actually involved in that party, because the RNC decided against superdelegates. That means ⅓ of people voting in Republican primaries, something like 10% of the total electorate, may be able to destroy the credibility (such as it is) of the Republican Party, without anyone being able to stop them.
    (That last isn’t really true, but the process is far uglier and potentially more damaging than the superdelegate route.)

    3) the self-important narcissist phenomenon isn’t exclusive to billionaires. Look through these comments. “We” should not tolerate… “I” will no longer support… “the will of the people”…
    You’re invited to participate in a party process according to the rules of that party. If you’re into rules and stuff, you’re invited to become part of the party decision-making process. If you’re only interested in standing on the sidelines, complaining that you weren’t awarded the same status within the party as people committed to and involved with the party, you’re invited to find a different party, because who needs people that misunderstand something as elementary as commitment and loyalty in a partisan organization?
    Criticizing and complaining because a party you vote for only caters to your whims on that basis, instead of giving you an insider voice in deciding policy, is identical to expecting a corporation whose product you buy to give you shareholder votes. You can vote for, purchase, contribute to and endorse whatever you like on the retail level, but beyond that you only own what you’ve earned.
    Democracy is worth defending, but with intelligence. That means figuring out what’s actually meant by “democracy” in a given civil society (because it’s never actually democracy, and the permutations are highly various), and it means figuring out the limits of democracy in that society. Simply asserting that everything should be decided by everybody equally is delusional and not very bright. Practically nothing is decided that way. It’s not even a reasonable ideal. Democratic ideals require people thinking about what works best for everyone, not simply insisting on having a say in everything themselves.
    Let me put it this way: superdelegates were invented to protect the party nomination process from political naïvité, unreflective impulsivity, and opportunistic interlopers. It’s not my opinion that Bernie Sanders’ campaign embodies all three, but that’s the opinion of many Democrats. Whining about their “unfair” self-defense mechanism is ridiculous. They’re entitled to defend themselves by any means they choose. Bernie Sanders is no more a Democrat than Donald Trump is a Republican. The Ds looked ahead to avoid having their party apparatus usurped by a non-aligned campaign. The Rs didn’t. The highly likely result is a D. win in November, directly attributable to superdelegates making sure their candidate is, whatever else she may be, actually a D.
    Finally, succinctly: Pat Leahy represents Vermont in Congress. He does not represent Vermont, nor even Vermont Democrats, in the nominating convention. There, he represents himself, in his best judgement, in the best interests of the national party. He would be failing in his duty if he started listening to people scold him for not doing what they tell him to do.

    • Paul Donovan

      Well said, Karl. I’m a little disappointed in a number of Democrats who I like very much, but I understand they’re making the best choice, in their view, for the Dems (and the country) as a whole. I won’t condemn them for that; it helps to remember that one can vote for whom they want, regardless if it’s the official nominee or not. A large segment of the electorate plan on voting for Bernie no matter what the Democratic Party does; it’s high time the party moved to the left rather than playing the middle. And they have moved (albeit ever so slightly) to embrace positions closer to Bernie’s, and in that sense, Bernie and his supporters have already won. Regardless of who wins the election, his influence will be felt from now on.

  • Thank you for this informative article. Our ward committee asked for the names of superdelegates and got the runaround. Party said they could not simply send us a list, they needed to explain it in person so there was no misunderstanding. SAY WHAT? List of 10 names, whether they are committed and to whom — looks simple to me.

    Thank you VT Digger. Dems deserve to know who the superdelegates are, and if they have committed to a candidate. If not supporting our “favorite son,” Bernie Sanders — who in this case is not only our favorite but a super-viable candidate — we want to know that. Bernie polls at greater than 80% people’s choice in Vermont. Past elections substantiate that poll. He is polling even with HRC nationwide. Is Dem Party a party of the people or not? (Rs, by the way, have no such superdelegate scheme.)

    Bernie is saving the so-called Democratic Party, and the party is too entrenched in old establishment control to realize it! Three cheers for Rep. Peter Welch!

    • Karl Riemer

      Rs do not have superdelegates but do have winner-take-most primaries and high thresholds for winning any delegates, which is another way for front-runners to consolidate insuperable leads before the convention. With multiple candidates in non-proportional primaries, a minority of the popular vote can garner an entire state’s or district’s delegation. Even close elections can result in huge delegate disparities. The D approximation of proportional primaries means that a clear and convincing popular vote negates the influence of superdelegates, but a close contest, with pledged delegates evenly divided, leaves the choice to party stalwarts. Both systems are designed to avoid protracted battles and exhausting, contentious conventions.

      • John Greenberg
        • Karl Riemer

          Those are not superdelegates. Those are at-large delegates.
          Bound and pledged delegates are allocated by district (usually congressional district) and state. In VT, the Ds have 11 district votes, 3 at-large votes, 2 party votes, for a total of 16. All of those votes are pledged, based on the popular primary vote. 10 more votes are unpledged. Those are the superdelegates, independent of the primary. Rs have 3 district votes, 10 at-large votes, 3 party votes, for, again, a total of 16. That’s all. VT only has 1 congressional district so in effect all R delegates are at-large, and all are bound to the winner of the state-wide primary vote. There are no R superdelegates, in any state, because there are no independent R delegate votes. Some of the delegate slots are reserved for party officials (3/state) to give them a ticket to the convention, but their votes are bound, at least at first or unless released, just as with any delegate.

  • Walter Judge

    Just wondering how many of the superdelegate-complainers and anti-Bernie-conspiracy-theorists know that it was Bernie’s campaign manager, Tad Devine, who helped create the superdelegate system, and has defended it?

    http://www.forwardprogressives.com/dnc-didnt-sabotage-bernie-sanders-campaign-delegate-conspiracy/

    http://www.msnbc.com/msnbc/superdelegates-center-democratic-nomination-fight-again

    • Fred Woogmaster

      Thanks for the most interesting information.

      Power alignments change in politics. If the “two party system” did not control the political landscape for all of us, including those of us who are political independents (I), who the individual responsible is would be far more important.

      The “superdelegates” are an obscene expression of undemocratic power in the political process – in my humble opinion, Mr. Judge; regardless of the origin.

  • Tom Sullivan

    Can anyone provide a link of the mandate that states an elected official must give his (or her) super delegates to the winner of the popular vote? I couldn’t find it.

    Thanks….

  • Karl Riemer

    This is not a defense of the DNC superdelegate allocations, which I personally consider retarded. The system was carefully considered, though, and is neither a subterfuge nor an abrogation of anyone’s rights. To the righteously indignant pontificators here, sure of their moral high ground as defenders of democracy, three points:

    1) the nomination process belongs to the DNC. They have no obligation to you. They serve the interests of their party, to the best of their ability. That’s their job. They decided, for prudent reasons, to weight the nomination process heavily toward party loyalists, partly by allocating delegate votes to states and districts based not on population but on Democratic vote totals in recent presidential elections, partly by making themselves, all high-ranking public and party officials, plus several prominent former officials, unpledged delegates.

    2) we’re witnessing a candidate running roughshod over the Republican party, increasingly likely to capture the nomination and represent the party in its biggest single race despite caring nothing for that party’s history or principles, or really anything except himself. A megalomaniacal narcissist is capitalizing on fragmented loyalties and mutual antipathies to kidnap a major party apparatus, against the wishes of virtually everyone working within that party, because the RNC decided against superdelegates. With 5 candidates still in the race, that means ⅓ of Republican primary voters, something like 10% of the total electorate, may be able to destroy the credibility of the Republican Party (such as it is), without anyone being able to stop them.
    (That last isn’t really true, but the backroom convention-brokering process is uglier and potentially more damaging than the superdelegate route.)

    3) self-important narcissism isn’t exclusive to billionaires. Look through these comments. “We” should not tolerate… “I” will no longer support… “the will of the people”… You’ve been invited to participate in a strictly party process according to the rules of that party. If you’re into rules, you’re invited to become part of the party decision-making process. If you’re only interested in complaining that everyone isn’t awarded the same status within the party as people committed to and involved with the party, you’re invited to find a different party, because who needs people that misunderstand something as fundamental as commitment and loyalty in a frankly partisan organization?

    Criticizing a party you vote for, for only catering to your whims that far instead of granting you an insider voice in deciding policy, is the same as expecting a corporation whose product you buy to give you shareholder votes. You can purchase or endorse whatever you like on the retail level, but you’re not entitled to run what you don’t own and haven’t earned.

    Democracy is worth defending, but with intelligence. That means figuring out what “democracy” actually means in a given civil society (because it’s never actually democracy, and the permutations are highly various), and it means figuring out the limits of democracy in that society. Simply asserting that everything should be decided by everybody equally is delusional. Nothing’s decided that way. It’s not even a reasonable ideal. Democratic ideals require people thinking about what works best for everyone, not simply insisting on having a say in everything themselves.

    Let me put it this way: superdelegates were invented to protect the party nomination process from political naïveté, unreflective impulsivity, and opportunistic interlopers. It’s not my opinion that Bernie Sanders’ campaign embodies all three, but that’s the opinion of many Democrats. Whining about their “undemocratic” self-defense mechanism is ridiculous. They’re entitled to defend themselves. Bernie Sanders is no more a Democrat than Donald Trump is a Republican. They’re both adopting a title of convenience, trying to vault to the front of lines in which they’ve declined to stand. The Ds looked ahead, arranging to avoid having their party apparatus usurped by an exogenous campaign. The Rs didn’t. The likely result is a D. win in November, directly attributable to superdelegates making sure their candidate is, whatever else she might be, actually a D.

    Finally, succinctly: Pat Leahy represents Vermont in Congress. He does not represent Vermont, nor Vermont Democrats, in the nominating convention. There, he represents himself, in his best judgement, in the best interests of his national party. He would be remiss in his responsibility if he started listening to people scold him, instructing him to vote the way they want him to.

    • Walter Judge

      Thank you, Mr. Riemer, for this thoughtful, informative, and non-shrill posting about the superdelegate system.

  • rosemarie jackowski

    Tired of corruption and cronyism? For those who have given up on the D/R Party, there is an alternative.
    GO GREEN.

    See this
    http://www.truthdig.com/report/item/why_i_support_dr_jill_stein_for_president_20160221

  • Sylvie Desautels

    DNC’s chair woman Wasserman Schultz”s comment at the end of Craven’s article says it all. “Unpledged delegates exist really to make sure that party leaders and elected officials don’t have to be in a position where they are running against grass-roots activists.” Just how democratic can the DNC be with this kind of “leadership” or rules? Isn’t grass roots activism what democracy is all about? Democrat or Republican, those in power want to stay in power, regardless of what voters want. No wonder the electorate in this country has been disenfranchised.

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