Race for lieutenant governor a tale of two campaign financing models

Dean Corren, a Progressive challenging incumbent Lt. Gov. Phil Scott, filed his paperwork for public financing Thursday morning with Secretary of State Jim Condos. Photo by Hilary Niles/VTDigger

Dean Corren, a Progressive challenging incumbent Lt. Gov. Phil Scott, filed his paperwork for public financing Thursday morning with Secretary of State Jim Condos. Photo by Hilary Niles/VTDigger

This year’s race for lieutenant governor is down to three contenders.

Progressive and publicly financed Dean Corren is taking on incumbent Republican Phil Scott. Liberty Union candidate Marina Brown is also running.

Democrat John Bauer dropped out of the race Thursday just hours before the deadline to file paperwork to appear on the ballot. He said his campaign hadn’t secured enough public support to qualify for public financing, as he had planned. He declined to disclose the amount he had raised to date.

Vermont’s public financing laws for the lieutenant governor race require at least $17,500 to be raised from no fewer than 750 individual contributions of no more than $50 each. (For gubernatorial candidates, the limits change to $35,000 from 1,500 qualified individual contributions, still capped at $50.)

With Bauer out, the smaller field will showcase a match between single-payer health care and economic development — the issues driving Corren’s and Scott’s respective campaign platforms.

Corren was a four-term state representative in the 1990s and a former aide to Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt. He’s now employed as an energy scientist working on underwater hydropower for a firm based out of New York. Corren is running with on a health care reform platform.

“We’ve put this off for a good 20 years since we first started talking about a comprehensive health care plan in the ’90s. So it’s time we did it,” Corren said Thursday morning after hand-delivering his paperwork to Secretary of State Jim Condos. “And having a lieutenant governor pushing in the same direction as the governor will help with that.”

Scott said he’ll continue to press for improvements in the state’s economic situation. Scott has served as lieutenant governor for four years; he was in the Senate from 2001 to 2010.

“I will prioritize the growth of our economy,” Scott said. “We have a crisis of affordability in Vermont.”

John Bauer of Jeffersonville is running for lieutenant governor. VTDigger photo

John Bauer. VTDigger photo

Bauer noted Thursday afternoon how closely his and Corren’s political positions are aligned. He’s publicly endorsed his would-be opponent.

“There’s no harm in getting out of the race,” Bauer said. “I think getting out of the race makes it possible for someone with like values (to compete).”

Gov. Peter Shumlin spoke with Bauer shortly after he withdrew, according to Sue Allen, the governor’s spokesperson.

“The governor respects John’s decision and knows it was a difficult one to make,” Allen wrote in an email.

Bauer’s last-minute withdrawal

Bauer said he was personally disappointed that he missed his goal. But, he said, his short campaign raised awareness about public campaign financing.

In a news release announcing his decision, Bauer said his campaign “would have been manageable had we as a party come together to support the goal of public financing.”

Ben Sarle, the communications director for the Vermont Democratic Party, said the party supported Bauer and public financing. The party typically is not involved in campaigns leading up to primaries, because it does not want to endorse one member over another.

Another candidate could have filed right up to the last minute, Sarle said — though he acknowledged Bauer was the only known Democratic candidate collecting signatures.

“There wasn’t officially not another candidate,” Sarle said. “If we were starting to support someone before the deadline and someone came up … it wouldn’t have worked.”

He said the party supports single-payer “in every way shape or form.”

Sarle stopped short, however, of endorsing Corren, the Progressive candidate who has made health care reform his central issue.

Tess Taylor is a former state representative who stepped down this year to become executive director of the single-payer advocacy group VTCURE. The group is organizing support for single-payer advocates in key political races around the state. She said she was waiting to see if there were any last-minute filings before she created a strategy for the lieutenant governor’s seat.

“I’m excited that there is somebody that is strongly behind a universal health care system,” Taylor said. “VTCURE, that’s all we’re about. We’re not married to party so much as the issue.”

Taylor pointed to last week’s upset in Virginia in which congressional candidate David Brat beat out Republican U.S. House majority leader Rep. Eric Cantor, as an example of how outsider candidates can oust incumbents.

“Somebody worked really hard to overtake an established candidate,” Taylor said. “It can happen, and it will take some work.”

Corren’s public financing

Aside from the intrigue of seeing a Republican and Progressive face off for the state’s second-highest office, a race between Scott and Corren is of interest as the first test of Vermont’s public campaign finance system in a decade.

Corren is the first candidate to qualify for public financing since Progressive Steve Hingtgen ran for the same seat in the 2004 election cycle, according to the Secretary of State’s Office.

No candidates applied for public financing in the 2002 cycle.

In the 2000 cycle, incumbent Lt. Gov. Doug Racine (now Secretary of the Agency of Human Services) took public money in his bid to keep that seat.

The same year, now-Sen. Anthony Pollina, P/D/W-Washington, took public financing to run against incumbent Gov. Howard Dean. Dean had initially qualified for public financing, but later backed away from that strategy.

Corren said built-in hurdles to public financing are appropriate.

Compared to simple signatures required of conventionally financed candidates, applicants for public financing must raise money, but with no more than 25 percent of contributors coming from any one county. He signed an affidavit swearing by the legitimacy of contributions to his campaign.

Lt. Gov. Phil Scott. Photo by Hilary Niles/VTDigger

Lt. Gov. Phil Scott. Photo by Hilary Niles/VTDigger

Scott said Thursday afternoon that Corren will be a “formidable” opponent, especially now that he has a “healthy war chest.”

According to VTDigger’s campaign finance database, Scott raised $191,316.01 in the 2011-2012 election cycle, of which he spent $129,192.20.

He’ll set his own fundraising goal this year to match Corren’s automatic $200,000, Scott said.

As a publicly financed candidate, Corren will get grants from a special fund within the Secretary of State’s Office that bring his purse up to $200,000: one-quarter of that is for the primary, and the rest is for the general election.

Within 10 days of each filing deadline, he’ll get a check for the difference between the amount he’s entitled to spend and the amount he raised in qualifying contributions.

In the event of a shortfall in the fund, candidates would receive less money.

Scott said he is philosophically opposed to public financing because he doesn’t want to take money from people who may not support him.

“I started thinking about what could be done with $200,000,” Scott said. He suggested the money could be better spent hiring three or four more case managers at the Department for Children and Families, or filling about 5,000 potholes.

“There are other ways to spend taxpayer money,” Scott said.

Public campaign money comes from fees paid to the secretary of state, not from the state’s General Fund, director of administrative services Marlene Betit said Thursday. In the event no candidates qualify for public financing in a given year, the surplus from that special fund is diverted to the General Fund.

The Vermont Legislature created a public campaign finance system in 1998, but money is only available for the gubernatorial and lieutenant governor races.

CORRECTION: This article was corrected at 12:29 p.m. on June 13, 2014. Candidates for statewide office only can file paperwork at the Secretary of State’s office.

Follow Hilary on Twitter @nilesmedia

Comments

  1. Paul Lorenzini :

    So, the progressive role model is to use as much public (other peoples) money as you can, or need to in order to win the election?

    • Peter Liston :

      Instead of having special interests, PACS, unions, corporations and billionaires buying our politicians? Yes, public financing is a good alternative to that.

      • Paul Lorenzini :

        Instead of willing donors they use the public money when the country is $17,000,000,000,000 in debt. And certainly there are no public funded unions, or other public entities that have special interests.

  2. Paul Lorenzini :

    I forgot to mention that the public funds were confiscated, or duty paid, not given willingly by an individual to their candidate. So what we have is the republicans, paid by corporations that feed on consumers, and D/P’s that feed off the taxes taken in by the very same folks. I smell something that doesn’t pass the smell test.

    • Peter Liston :

      So what’s a good solution?

      • Paul Lorenzini :

        It seems as if there is no solution Peter. We have to let this system collapse upon itself, then we can find a new solution that doesn’t include the myriad of non solutions that have gotten us here. I will still vote, however I am disgusted that I have to donate to a campaign, it may only be a penny, but it was my penny and this guy is taking it and offering people like myself nothing in return except Agenda 21 population reduction measures.

  3. Paul Lorenzini :

    Have you polled the public and found out how many of them realize their dollars are funding Mr. Corren? Or if they have even heard where their dollars are going? What percentage of the populace has even heard of him? Factfinders, diggers, please get this info.

  4. Paul Lorenzini :

    Publicly funded campaigns sounds remarkable like all communist nations. We are in a Yay or no vote for you kind of state.

    • “Publicly funded campaigns sounds remarkable like all communist nations.”
      To try to tie public financing to communism, is pathetic attempt to discredit the candidate(s) that accepts it.

    • John Greenberg :

      Yup, those commies nations Australia, Austria, Britain, Canada, Germany, & Japan (and many others) all have publicly funded elections. Notably all 6 of those countries have right-wing governments at the moment.

  5. Paul Lorenzini :

    How many cigarette tax dollars are going to Mr. Corren? Oh yeah, that general fund thing right?
    None?

  6. Darcie Johnston :

    How many Republicans voted for public financing grants? Last vote was in 2005 and if you look at the vote you will see Republican Senators who voted for the campaign finance reform bill and didn’t offer any amendment to remove public financing. I guess we have elected officials who supported public financing before they were against it..

  7. boots wardinski :

    nice to see the progs and dems getting along so well.

  8. Jason Farrell :

    “As a publicly financed candidate, Corren will get grants from a special fund within the Secretary of State’s Office that bring his purse up to $200,000: one-quarter of that for the primary, and the rest for the general election.”

    Where does this $200,000 number originate in the Vermont statutes?

    Title:17 Elections
    Chapter 59: Campaign Finance
    Sub-Chapter 06: Vermont Campaign Finance Option
    17 V.S.A. § 2855. Vermont campaign finance grants; amounts; timing

    (b) (2) For Lieutenant Governor, $25,000.00 in a primary election period and $75,000.00 in a general election period, provided that the grant for a primary election period shall be reduced by an amount equal to the candidate’s qualifying contributions.

    Lieutenant Governor Phil Scott has made this statement in this report and on Facebook:
    “I started thinking about what could be done with $200,000,” Scott said. He suggested the money could be better spent hiring three or four more case managers at the Department for Children and Families, or filling about 5,000 potholes.”

    Where is that “automatic” $200,000 amount coming from? Is it really $200,000 taxpayer dollars, is it the lesser amount cited in the statute, or is there another statute I’m missing?

    • Jason Farrell :

      Found it.

      Act 90 of the 2013-2014 session titled “An Act Relating to Campaign Finance Law” increased the amount of public money available to a qualifying candidate in both the primary and general elections.

      From this year’s bill:

      17 V.S.A. § 2985. Vermont campaign finance grants; amounts; timing

      (b) (2) For Lieutenant Governor, $50,000.00 in a primary election period
      and $150,000.00 in a general election period, provided that the grant for a
      primary election period shall be reduced by an amount equal to the candidate’s
      qualifying contributions;

      Sec. 2 of the newly-passed Act 90 is titled “REPEAL”
      17 V.S.A chapter 59 (campaign finance) is repealed.
      Sec. 3 17 V.S.A. chapter 61 is added…

      Although Act 90 was signed into law on January 23, 2014, “The Vermont Statutes Online” has not been updated to reflect the change in law.

      • Jason Farrell :

        And the “Notes” section of the site gives the answer why it’s not been updated…

        “Notes
        The Vermont Statutes Online do not yet reflect the actions of the 2014 legislative session. We typically receive and post the updates in mid-October.”

        I learned some stuff today!

  9. Kelly Cummings :

    Nice try but no cigar. Mr. Scott, let’s talk about the issues.

    I think maybe some see Dean Corren as a big ol’ threat!

    As they should….he’s an intelligent, thoughtful and big thinking individual. A solution seeker.

    Just the kind of person we need for Lt. Governor!

    • Glenn Thompson :

      Not really if he is a Progressive! Perhaps he will hire former Burlington mayor Bob Kiss as a campaign manager? Kiss did such a wonderful job as Mayor of Burlington! {{{{rolleyes}}}}

      • Paul Lorenzini :

        Being a big thinker, does not make someone a big person, Kelly. Chairman Mao was a big thinker right? How about Marx? Big thinkers aren’t usually concerned with little people.

        • Peter Liston :

          Ghandi. Jesus Christ. MLK Jr.

  10. Jonathan Willson :

    Well that’s my first campaign contribution to a Progressive….Unfortunately, I didn’t make it willingly.

    • Kelly Cummings :

      But at least you know where it came from!

      You gotta admit….no special corporate interest money here.

      That’s a good thing! No corporate donations for Dean Corren.

      His words will be his….not theirs

      Progress.

      • Paul Lorenzini :

        Progress toward what end? Population reduction?

    • Did you check the box on your tax return to donate money to the campaign finance fund? If not, you have no way of knowing if any of your money actually went into the campaign finance fund.

      Let’s just pretend that your share of appropriations paid into the campaign came from taxes that I paid and my share of appropriations for something I do not particularly like funding but that you do came from taxes that you paid. Then we can both sleep easier and not have to worry about it.

  11. Paul Lorenzini :

    I would like to know how many of his signatures, and donations came from folks with special interests, Jerry?

  12. Kelly Cummings :

    Paul. You confuse me. :)

    Would you please share with me something you do like?

    Just so you know, this is a sincere question and not a jab.

    Also what would be a bonafide real solution to this problem you see?

    And by the way…what do you have against Groucho Marx?

    “Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies.”

    - Groucho Marx

    Population reduction?

  13. Don’t get me wrong, I am not opposed to public financing of campaigns. I do, however think it is a very said commentary on our system and our society in general that it costs $200,000 (or more) to have a chance at being elected Lieutenant Governor of VT.

  14. Patrick Cashman :

    Has Mr. Corren publicly announced how those Vermonters who don’t wish to support his campaign can request a refund? It seems a bit outlandish that Vermonters who find his views anathema would be forced to financially support them.

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